Cowon iAudio D2 Review

cowon iaudio d2 main Cowon iAudio D2 Review

The D2 is Cowon’s first ultra portable video player and their first foray into the wondrous world of touch screens. Although similar in appearance to the iriver clix, the D2 sports some significant differences under the hood: things usually not found in this class of players like TV output, support for lossless audio codecs, and an SD/SDHC card slot for unlimited expansion.

Let’s see if the D2 lives up to the reputation Cowon earned with some of their earlier players…

Please check out the iAudio D2 Forum for discussion and help with the D2.

  • Quick Look
  • Audio: MP3, Ogg Vorbis, WMA, FLAC, APE, WAV, AAC (only on older firmware versions)
  • Video: MPEG4-SP (DivX, XviD, …), WMV9 – 320 x 240, 30fps
  • Photo: JPEG (no size limit)
  • Screen: 2.5″, 24 bit (16 million) color, 320 x 240, TFT-LCD
  • Dimensions: 78.0 x 55.4 x 16.6 mm (3.07 x 2.18 x 0.65 inches)
  • Weight: 91 g (3.21 oz)
  • Rated battery life: 52 hours for music, 10 hours for video
  • Other features: Touch screen, SD/SDHC card slot, TV-out, FM radio, voice/line-in/FM recorder, BBE sound enhancements, user-configurable effect presets, text viewer, date/time/alarm, bookmarks, on-the-go playlist, deleting files on the player, dictionary (only with Korean firmware)
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Accessories

Inside the box you will find earphones (rebranded Cresyn phones), AC adaptor, standard USB to Mini-USB cable, stylus, quick start guide, and a software CD (JetShell, JetAudio VX, Windows 98 drivers).

The first thing everyone should consider is an upgrade to better phones. The Cresyn phones aren’t really bad, but to enjoy the sound quality of the D2 you should definitely get some better ones. Other accessories are sold separately, such as the TV-out cable, line/mic-in cable converter, cases, and screen protectors. Unfortunately no docking station, remote control, or line-out cable converter is available at the moment.

Design

The player is even smaller than it appears in pictures, or at least that’s my impression. Build quality seems solid, and the weight feels right. Nothing is flimsy or fragile on the D2, except maybe the cover for the USB ports. The slightly rough-textured plastic frame and back plate appear to be scratch resistant, and the back plate has four small bumps to further prevent abrasion. The D2′s housing doesn’t overly attract fingerprints.

The same cannot be said for the touch screen, however. You’ll see every tiny smudge, as is the case with any smooth touch-sensitive interface. It’s not a big problem, since any grime can be wiped off easily with one’s shirt (or whatever else might be within reach). The screen doesn’t seem to scratch easily, but using a screen protector is highly recommended, especially when carrying the D2 around in your pocket.

The stylus, a small plastic triangle used for operating the touch screen, doubles as a stand for the D2. This only works relatively well; the D2 topples over rather easily. Furthermore, there’s no silo to store the stylus, unlike on every Palm PDA or Pocket PC. You’re supposed to attach the stylus to the D2 with a short lanyard. Imagine the scratches that could happen to the screen resulting from that practice. I stopped using the stylus altogether after spending about five minutes with the D2. The stylus/stand combination is a neat idea, but not very well executed.

Software

No software is needed to use the D2 on any halfway-modern computer. Being a MSC/UMS compliant device, it works on Windows 2000/XP/Vista, Mac OS 9/OS X, Linux, and others as soon as you plug it in. Drivers for Windows 98/ME computers are included on the CD. The player and SD slot are recognized as standard removable storage disks. You can drag and drop files over to the player’s internal memory or SD card and sort them in folders, the same way you would on your computer’s hard disk. The option to use MTP transfer is also available with newer firmware versions, but this will only work on Windows XP and Vista without too much trouble.

Neverthel
ess, Cowon includes two applications on the CD that comes with the player. One is JetShell, a file manager for syncing your audio collection to the D2. The other is JetAudio VX, a multimedia player and audio/video converter. I do not use them since I already have other software for these tasks. However, both may come in handy if you’re not already accustomed to using other applications. They both work fairly well. Freedom of choice indeed is a great thing since you’re not forced to use any specific software with the D2.

User Interface

Navigation Controls

Almost everything is controlled by using the touch screen, so it might take some time getting used to the controls. At first, single-handed operation seems almost impossible, but it is actually possible to perform most clicks with the thumb of one hand while holding the D2 in the same hand. Of course, operating the D2 with only one hand is definitely impossible when using the stylus. A further annoyance is that even the most simple steps take at least three clicks – the first click activates the screen, the second activates the onscreen menu, the third click finally does what you want it to do (e.g., fast-forward). Scrolling has been made easier on recent firmware versions. A “virtual motion” control has been implemented, similar to the iPhone’s method of navigation. Sliding up and down anywhere on the screen scrolls lists, and sliding to the left exits folders or leads to the main screen, depending on where you are. The controls still could use some refinement; let’s hope Cowon continues improving the usability in further firmware versions. Another positive point is the smooth responsiveness of the menu. Clicking on menu items opens them immediately; there’s no noticeable lag.

Only three hardware buttons and the power/hold slider “clutter” the upper surface of the D2: two buttons for volume and a (rather superfluous) menu button with assignable secondary function (play/pause, skip track). Newer firmware versions let you redefine functions for all three buttons when the hold switch is enabled. For example, the volume buttons can be mapped to fast-forward and rewind tracks . . . but then you lose the volume control function. You would have to disable hold to adjust volume, and then enable hold to fast-forward and rewind. In short, the D2 does not have enough buttons to be operated comfortably while in your pocket. With some practice one could get used to “guessing” where the hot spots for fast-forward and rewind are on the touch screen. But since it’s not advisable to stick the D2 in your pocket without hold enabled (since the touch screen reacts to unintentional pushes rather easily), I very often find myself taking the player out of my pocket and looking at the display for even the most basic of operations – a lot more than I’m used to with other players. Standard 5-way navigation would have been much better, be it joystick, click pad, or anything else.

This rant applies mostly to the D2 used as an audio player on the go. The touch screen is a lot more reasonable for the video and image viewer modes when you are most likely to be looking at the screen all the time. Usability as an audio player would improve immensely if Cowon released a remote control with enough buttons for the D2, but it’s not known if the hardware would actually support this.


Graphical User Interface

The main screen provides direct access to all major functions of the D2: Audio, Video, Picture, Text, Radio, Record, and Settings. Compared to the tacky user interfaces of some older Cowon players, the visual appeal has improved a lot on the D2. Colors are toned down, and everything looks more professional.

The audio playback screen of the D2 shows you nearly every bit of information you could possibly wish for. It might overwhelm casual users, but it’s certainly a good thing for people who like to keep track of what’s going on. The screen shows the ID3 tags in three lines (album/artist/title), album art, track time (elapsed/remaining or total – simultaneously), stereo peak level, bitrate (kb/s) and sample rate (kHz), 5-band EQ settings (yes, it shows the EQ bands on the main screen), BBE enhancement settings (BBE/M3B/3DS/STE/MPE), volume level, real time clock, random/repeat settings, and battery level.

The menu is available in several languages (English, Korean, Japanese, German, French, Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Italian, Dutch, Russian, Greek, and Hebrew). On a side note, Cowon’s programmers obviously forgot to implement a 24-hour clock. Even though a lot of European languages are available, there’s only an American 12-hour AM/PM clock.

Browsing for music must also be done via the touch interface. It can be handled through both common approaches, by file/folder browsing or by ID3 browsing. Deleting audio and video files is possible directly on the player; folders cannot be deleted, though. A slight annoyance when browsing by file/folder is that there is no quick way to switch between the internal memory of the D2 and the SD card. Navigating out of several subfolders back to the root folder or using the “Music Library” button, which takes you to the ID3-browsing screen (not the folder view), are the only ways to go from internal memory to SD card, and vice versa. In ID3-browsing mode, the internal and external files are merged together.

I wish ID3 browsing could be disabled altogether so the D2 doesn’t need to rebuild its ID3 database after disconnecting from a computer in MSC mode. It’s not really a big issue; the rebuild takes about 20-30 seconds and a normal bootup only takes 2-4 seconds, but I’d still like to have a clean file/folder-based player without seeing the ID3-browsing options at all.Album art for audio files works very well. It can be embedded into ID3v2 tags, or simply as a JPEG located in an album’s folder. The album art gets resized automatically for the screen so there’s no need to convert the images. Some of my MP3 files have JPEGs with a size of 800 x 800 pixels embedded and they work fine. The images are only displayed during music playback, not while browsing files.

Battery

Battery life is excellent, with a whopping 52 hours for audio playback and 10 hours for videos. Of course this is the “optimal” time as stated by Cowon. But even when playing high-bitrate VBR files with all sound enhancements turned on, the D2 will run for days.

The included AC adaptor fully charges the D2 in 3.5 hours. Charging over USB takes 7 hours due to the low power output of USB ports. The player can be used while charging from AC, but not while it’s connected via USB.

Features

SD/SDHC Card Expansion Slot

The SD slot is arguably one of the best hardware features of the D2. With a recent firmware update it supports newfangled SDHC cards, currently available up to 8GB. In a 4GB D2, this makes for a hefty 12GB of total storage. Not bad at all for a device of this size. The only thing that still needs to be fixed in the firmware is a quicker way to switch between browsing the internal memory of the player and the SD card when using file/folder navigation, as mentioned above.

FM Radio

The FM radio is as basic as they come; it’s possible to auto-scan for stations and store 24 presets. The presets cannot be named and RDS isn’t supported either. Reception is not the strongest, but it might depend on the headphones plugged into the D2, since those are used as the antenna. Newer firmware versions slightly improve FM reception. Recording from radio is simple and works well. Unfortunately it’s only possible to record at up to 256kb/s WMA quality; recording to MP3 is not supported. A timer can be set for automatic FM recording.

Voice Recording

The voice recorder has some proble
ms. On recordings made with the internal microphone, there is an audible high-pitched whine in the background. It picks up voices well even in noisier environments, but the whine the D2 adds to the recordings is rather irritating. Maximum possible quality is 256kb/s WMA. The mic’s sensitivity can be adjusted in five steps, but for some reason no voice activation feature is included (this was available on older Cowon players).

It is also possible to record from an external microphone when using the line-in converter cable (sold separately). There’s no high-pitched background noise when using an external mic, and it sounds better than the internal mic of the D2. However, recordings can’t be set to mono. When a mono microphone is attached, the recorded sound will play only on the left channel of the stereo recording. One more firmware issue for the list.

Line-In Recording

Line-in recordings at up to 256kb/s WMA can be made via the optional line-in converter cable, and sound quality is good. It is possible to pause a recording and resume later. The D2 can also split tracks automatically when it detects silence, a useful feature when recording directly from vinyl records, for example. Record gain level and split sensitivity are manually adjustable.

This is where Cowon’s choice of using Microsoft’s proprietary WMA codec annoys me the most. The D2 would be a great recorder if it used the more widespread MP3 format instead of WMA. There are several free applications out there to manipulate MP3 files losslessly, or non-destructively, like MP3Gain, MP3DirectCut, and others. As far as I know, you can’t do that with WMA files. With WMA, you have to decode the audio to uncompressed WAV to do any editing. Some quality is lost by converting the audio files to another format.

Transferring Files / Removable Disk

Being UMS Mass Storage Class compliant means the D2 is nothing but a removable disk. You can store any files anywhere on the FAT16/32 formatted internal memory or on the SD card and access them on any modern operating system. The only downside is the USB transfer speeds of 35-40 Mb/s, very slow considering USB 2.0 is capable of 480 Mb/s.

With recent firmware versions the player can also be switched to MTP operation, a transfer protocol that only works well on Windows XP and Vista.

Photo Viewer

The supported format for the image viewer is JPEG, and there are no size limits. It is possible to zoom and rotate images, or pan and scan around them. Pan and scan works very well (this is where the touch screen really makes for a useful interface), and it’s also possible to run a slide show. The speed of the slide show is adjustable and can be paused or stopped. Music playback continues while viewing images.

In thumbnail view, the D2 displays twelve small images at once on its screen. Building the thumbnails is rather fast and takes less than a second for a photo taken with a five-megapixel camera. Loading full-sized images is fast, too: less than two seconds. Images can be set as wallpaper and will show up on all screens of the interface.

All in all, the image viewer is really well executed, with only one obvious flaw: images can’t be deleted directly from the player. Seems like another oversight in the firmware, since audio and video files can be deleted from the D2.

Other Features

Other noteworthy features are the alarm clock with three different modes (audio player, FM radio, and FM recording) and a sleep timer, adjustable in 10-minute steps up to only 60 minutes. Almost every other player’s sleep timer goes up to 120 minutes; I wonder why Cowon thought they had to reduce the maximum time to an hour.

The bookmarking feature seems to work well for both audio and video files. However, sometimes the bookmarks disappear or get corrupted after the D2 has been connected to a computer. Trying to open a corrupted bookmark was the only time when my D2 crashed and had to be reset. Let’s again hope for a fix in future firmware versions.

One thing that really bothers me is the “resume” setting. It does not resume. It just remembers the location the D2 has been within an audio or video file, but doesn’t automatically resume playing after turning the player on. Three clicks are needed to actually resume playback (enter audio/video mode, activate on-screen menu, press play). Someone obviously forgot to look up the definition of “resume” in the dictionary.

A simple text reader is also included; it’s reasonably useful and quite readable at 14 lines per screen. Several font and background colors for the reader can be selected from a list. Audio playback continues while displaying text, and lyric display for songs is also supported.

Upgrading the firmware is kind of a hassle compared to some other Cowon/iAudio players. You have to drag and drop the firmware in three separate steps into the D2′s root folder and several restarts between the steps are needed. All content gets deleted from the D2′s memory in the process, and all settings are reset to default. As you already may have noticed, the current firmware (v2.41) isn’t very mature.

Audio

The D2 is top notch when it comes to sound quality. Without any equalization or enhancements turned on, it reproduces the whole audible frequency spectrum evenly distributed and linear. The treble and mids are there, as is the exceptionally good bass response without any roll-off.

The 74mW amp is one of the strongest – if not the strongest – for portable players today; it drives even difficult headphones up to at least 100 Ohms impedance with ease. Channel separation is very good. The Wolfson CODEC and Telechips SOC used in the D2 have a good signal-to-noise ratio and are overall great sounding. Can’t get much better than that. You have to hear the player yourself to appreciate the difference in sound quality, compared to most other companies’ offerings.

No background noise is audible with medium- to high-impedance headphones. However, with the most sensitive low-impedance phones I use, the Ultimate Ears Super.Fi 5 EB (rated at 11 Ohms, 119 dB/mW), almost no background hiss can be heard at any reasonable volume setting. However, turning the D2 up to maximum volume, I can hear the hiss quite clearly. Mind you, I only tested this when no sound was playing; my head would explode instantly playing music with these phones at that volume level. So it’s not a real issue and shouldn’t bother too many people. Other phones with higher impedance than around 30 Ohms are completely noise-free at even the highest volume levels.

Almost any audio format you can throw at the player is supported: MP3, Ogg Vorbis, WMA, FLAC, APE, WAV, and AAC. Supporting two lossless codecs, FLAC and APE, next to uncompressed WAV seems like a bit of overkill for a flash player. But considering unlimited storage via SD cards, lossless audio might certainly be of use for some people. On a side note, AAC was only available in firmware versions up to 2.21. What made Cowon ditch the format again? No formats are played back truly gapless, but the gaps between tracks are usually just a fraction of a second, almost negligible.

EQ and Sound Options

Cowon provides a basic 5-band equalizer on the D2, which works quite well. Bands are adjustable in the +/- 12dB range. The EQ has six presets (Normal / Rock / Jazz / Classic / Pop / Vocal) and one user-definable setting. The interesting thing is that all the presets can be modified; tweaking the EQ is not just limited to the user preset. A very intelligent move by Cowon to not force any arbitrary presets on their customers, but to just deliver suggestions for useful settings that can be further tweaked to one’s personal liking.

Advice: “audiophiles” should consider skipping the next few paragraphs and continue reading further below. The audio enhancement settings on the D2 might not be the most suitable topic for purists. Cowon licensed some quite fine-sounding algorithms from Californian studio-gear manufacturer BBE Sound
, Inc.
, best known for their Sonic Maximizer hardware, used in many professional recording studios and by lots of artists on stage. For some reason Cowon prefers to call these BBE enhancements “JetEffects.”

If you’re already familiar with SRS WOW or similar enhancements found on other players and you think they sound bad . . . well, I definitely would agree with you. But BBE is several leagues above other psychoacoustic tricks usually found in portable devices. It sounds less unnatural than other algorithms, enriches the audio signal, and crossfeeds the sound so headphones sound more spacious, more like listening to loudspeakers. I’m not quite sure about the difference between “3D Surround” and “Stereo Enhance”: they both create a wider stereo field. “Stereo Enhance” is the less muddy sounding of the two.

For my taste the most important BBE option is “Mach3Bass,” a psychoacoustic bass enhancer that sounds really good and does not distort on quality headphones. It does not sound like other bass enhancers that only bloat the mid-bass frequencies, but really emphasizes the low bass registers without making the overall sound image muddy.

The last and maybe least useful feature is “MP Enhance,” short for “Minimized Polynomial Non-Linear Saturation,” a process used to try to restore harmonics and frequencies lost at compressing music to low bitrate quality. Using it on MP3s at 128kb/s or lower makes the treble sound a bit brighter, but that’s about it according to my ears. The treble might get too bright on some audio material, so I never turn “MP Enhance” on. Using it on high quality encodes doesn’t make much of a difference at all.

Cowon also implemented a novelty feature on the D2; pitching the playback speed in the 50% – 150% range, in 10% steps. This might be mildly useful for listening to voice recordings, but I really don’t see much use for it.

A godsend feature for people using several different headphones or loudspeakers is the possibility to store various EQ and BBE settings in 10 preset slots. This makes changing the overall sound character (for example, when switching from earbuds to full-sized headphones or loudspeakers) a breeze.

Audio Playback Options

The shuffle, repeat, and boundary modes on the D2 are quite well thought-out. Boundary works on the whole disk, a folder, or a single file. Combining this feature with shuffle and repeat modes makes for a rather versatile tool. A-B repeat is possible within one audio file. All these functions are quite comfortable to use with the touch screen interface. They’re just two clicks away from the main audio screen.

When using a reasonable folder structure on the D2, there is no need for playlists since shuffling over certain folders is much more intuitive and much less hassle to set up. Playlists are supported, however. Tracks can also be added to a dynamic playlist with a few clicks. ID3 browsing and connecting via MTP is also supported in the recent firmware version, but it’s still buggy and not really that great to use.

It is possible to specify a fade-in time (adjustable from 1-5 seconds)for resuming playback after the sound was paused. That’s just a small detail, but one I wouldn’t want to miss. It makes resuming audio playback less brutal for the ears than jumping to full volume straight away.

Video

This is what the D2 does best. The screen is stunning with its 24 bit (16 million) colors, albeit a bit small at 2.5″ for comfortably watching the director’s cut of Lord of the Rings. However, I already watched some full-length movies on the D2; the screen size didn’t trouble me much. Color gradients look really smooth; there’s no comparison to 16 bit (64K colors) or 18 bit (260K colors) screens, as found on most other video players. Viewing angles are very good from the sides and from above. Watching from an angle below center doesn’t look that good. I wish they would have put the screen upside down into the D2, as watching from below seems to be the more natural way.

Supported video codecs are MPEG4 Simple Profile (XviD, DivX, and others) and WMV3, also known as Windows Media Video 9 (to make things a bit more confusing). The D2 only eats videos at a screen size of 320 x 240 pixels, which is a shame. Official specs show that the D2 is able to play MPEG4 videos at an utterly insane bitrate of 2000kb/s. Usually 500 to 700kb/s is more than enough for a screen size this small. This makes me wonder if the D2′s hardware would actually be strong enough to play 640 x 480 movies, and if the need to convert any video to 320 x 240 is only a limitation by the firmware and not the chipset. The TV-output would benefit immensely from a bigger video size.

Watching video on a TV over the D2′s optional TV-out cable looks surprisingly good, considering the measly output size of 320 x 240 pixels. I noticed no distortions or interferences on my 32″ TV; the image is crisp and colors are saturated. Only edges, diagonal lines, and similar visual material looks rather jagged due to the small video size. But overall I’m impressed by the quality.

Another nice feature is that the EQ and BBE sound enhancements work on video files, too. Dropping the phat bass while watching Bambi or Beethoven’s latest MTV hit video clip might certainly come in handy.

Considering how tiny the D2 is, the rated battery life of 10 hours for video playback is absolutely excellent. Only Cowon’s huge A2 video player is rated the same; most other popular video players have a considerably shorter battery time.

Converting Video

Since the D2 can be fed with standard MPEG4-SP files, there are lots of options to get your videos to the supported screen size and codec format. Of course this wouldn’t be necessary at all if the D2 supported files with bigger screen sizes than 320 x 240. My favorite application for this tiresome task is the free iRiverter since it’s the most simple, hassle-free one-click video converter I know of. Of course, the included JetAudio app works well, too. Other great free software would be Virtualdub or SUPER. The choices are almost endless; it’s just a matter of preference.

Conclusion

If you want the tiniest video player with the best screen quality, battery life, and expandable memory, then look no further. There’s nothing that compares to the D2: highly recommended for lovers of near-microscopic gadgets that perform almost like their (much) bigger brothers. It even surpasses most of them in terms of screen quality and battery life.

However, if you want a simple, easy-to-operate audio player, then the D2 is probably not the right one for you. Sure, it’s an audio aficionado’s dream – sound quality is excellent and the strong amp drives demanding headphones with ease – but a touch screen interface doesn’t quite cut it for operating the player easily on the go. I somehow learned to live with these shortcomings, but I still find myself having to take the player out of my pocket to look at the screen for simple things I can do blindly on other players.

I’ve gone through three different firmware versions while writing this review, and none of them was perfect. With every one issue fixed, another one was introduced. Let’s hope Cowon gets their act together and releases a firmware without annoyances soon. Don’t get me wrong, the D2 is a really nice player – great sound, video, battery – but the handling definitely feels somewhat unrefined as of yet.

Pros

  • Excellent audio quality, very strong amplifier
  • Excellent video quality, very good screen
  • Excellent battery life
  • SD/SDHC card slot
  • TV output (with optional cable)
  • Huge variety of supported audio codecs
  • BBE audio enhancements
  • Preset slots for various EQ and BBE settings
  • Line-in (with optional cable), FM, and voice recording
  • UMS Mass Storage Class, works on any modern operating system without any software (but MTP also available)
  • Audio tracks sorted by file
    /folder, next to ID3 browsing
  • Informative screen
  • Fast, responsive menu
  • Standard Mini-USB jack for data transfer and charging

Cons

  • Firmware still needs a lot of work (inconsistencies, bugs, annoyances in v2.41)
  • Touch screen control isn’t overly user-friendly or time saving
  • Not enough hardware buttons for comfortable operation, no remote control available
  • Impractical stylus/stand design
  • Records only to WMA, not MP3 or WAV
  • Absurdly high bitrate for MPEG4, but no bigger video size than 320 x 240 supported (for TV-out)
  • Bookmarks and dynamic playlists sometimes disappear
  • “Resume” doesn’t really resume
  • Slow USB transfer
  • Still no gapless playback (Cowon, are you listening?)

Purchase

Cowon doesn’t sell through brick-and-mortar retailers in the US so your best bet is a search on Amazon (Amazon UK) or other online retailers. For those of you in the EU and UK, you can find Cowon at select B&M retailers or you can get one from AdvancedMP3Players.

91 Comments

Kas on April 16, 2007 7:41 PM

So the casing is plastic and not metal? I was under the assumption it was a brushed metal casing from the pictures :P . Great review by the way, very informative.

-PL-mike on April 16, 2007 8:11 PM

Nice review…I’m waiting for a new Crative Zen Vision M or a Toshiba Gigabeat anything above 20 gigs. This MP3 looks very nice, but I’m not too convinced with the brand name. :(

Beyond on April 16, 2007 8:40 PM

Cowon actually has the 2nd best customer satisfaction reputation in America.

Ned on April 16, 2007 10:16 PM

Good review. I bought the 2G when it was first introduced in the US. Personally, I like the 2.41 firmware the best, especially since you can setup the three buttons to be forward/pause/reverse, and holding down forward or pause will just fast-forward through the song rather then skip to the next. That feature made it a good ‘on-the-go’ device for me.They ‘almost’ have the music library working with 2.41 too… there does not seem to be a way to create a playlist of albums, which I want. If it had features I liked from the Rio Karma, it would be perfect.Also, rumor has it 2.41 can take a 8G card… 3000 files on internal mem and 3000 files externally… lots of listening time.

e260 on April 16, 2007 10:22 PM

This or the Meizu M6??

Ned on April 16, 2007 11:06 PM

Not sure if you were asking about my comments… but if you were, I was talking about the Cowon D2… I have the 2 Gig version of it. After re-reading it I can see that I wasn’t very clear.

Cruleworld on April 16, 2007 11:10 PM

I’m gonna read this tomorrow, I’m looking into getting one this fall.

Cowon#1 on April 17, 2007 12:26 AM

I have the D2 and I have to say this is a VERY accurate review …very nice job…

Bruce on April 17, 2007 8:39 AM

touchscreens are definitely a gimmick. Despite that, this seems like a nice player.

JDGAFFLIN on April 17, 2007 9:25 AM

Great review Martin. Im very interested after reading.

dfkt on April 17, 2007 10:16 AM

Kas, you can buy metallic stickers to, um, “pimp” the D2… but the plastic housing does feel really sturdy, I don’t really see the need for a protective case.

David on April 17, 2007 10:26 AM

Great review, I’m definitely considering getting this device.

btdown on April 17, 2007 10:38 AM

Is the battery removable? This bit of info needs to be in every review you do. It makes a big difference to me, and a lot of others.

Ned on April 17, 2007 11:08 AM

The battery is not removable… and from an different review I saw a while ago, its actually a custom battery just for this device so you really can’t replace it if you opened it up.Odds are you got 2-3 years on the device, but of course, ymmv.

dfkt on April 17, 2007 11:36 AM

Yes, 2-3 years should be more than likely, considering the 50+ hours of rated battery time. And Cowon doesn’t charge an arm and a leg for replacing batteries, like other companies do. It should be unbureaucratic and hassle-free with them, considering my experiences with Cowon’s customer support.On a side note, I think removable batteries are a bit overrated – many people will have a new player in three years, not looking back at their “ancient” D2 then… ;)

kadajawi on April 17, 2007 3:45 PM

@-PL-mike: I’d say Cowon is miles above Toshiba and Creative… besides iRiver and maaaaybe Meizu THE top brand on the market. Check reviews and customer experiences. Eventhough the three are pretty expensive (except for Meizu in China) those are the only I would get a MP3 player from. Toshiba maybe if the deal is great, but otherwise…@dfkt: As one who is also interested in second hand MP3 players (the good brands are so expensive, and a Cowon iAudio M3 does nearly everything I could ever want from a MP3 player) I think removable batteries are great. Hell, my iRiver is 5 yo, still running fine, day for day.Nice review, I’m a bit worried about the firmware bugs, though I expect Cowon to fix them (unlike Microsoft). Also that the usage is hard to use without looking at the screen makes it useless for me. Cowon should integrate gestures while in hold mode (like press one of the buttons and then draw a line on the display to trigger an action). Something that rarely happens accidentally but is easy enough to do blind.

dfkt on April 17, 2007 4:17 PM

It would be even better if they released a remote control. :)

a12ctic on April 17, 2007 5:36 PM

I’ve been looking into something to watch my movies on the go, the sansa just isnt cutting it, but I think im gona wait for the player sandisk is releasing. I dont really like the idea of a touch screen. Nice review.

aholl333 on April 17, 2007 8:22 PM

can you get headphones with a line-in remote and use them with the cowon d2? because that would make blind use very easy.

Rune on April 17, 2007 8:58 PM

Well, it’s got very little storage, the user interface requires you to smear your fingerprints all over the screen, the audio may be very good, but the video resolution is ridiculously small.I just got an Archos 604 (not WiFi+Touchscreen), and the 30GB storage and 4.3″ wide screen and faster USB transfer speeds make it a much better choice if you don’t mind the player being a little larger.I got mine primarily for portable video, so our priorities may differ.

Kas on April 17, 2007 10:40 PM

Yep a remote would be nice, give some buttons for blind use while players on hold. Though, I can’t imagine it being TOO difficult to just get a feel for the player and where to hit on the player for FF, RW, or Pause. It’d be nice if a remote was released though, would probably attract more customers for them who hesitate to buy because of the touchscreen.

Stuchers on April 18, 2007 2:43 AM

I’ve got a 4gb D2 with a 4gb SD in it, which makes 8Gb all up. I also own an Archos 604 (non-wifi) and i can safely say this thing blows the 604 out of the water. The features (battery life mainly) of the D2 completely kills it in almost every field, substantially the audio functions, the Archos sounds like a cheap piece of crap compared to the D2′s massive output and amazing sound quality.I’m definately selling my 604.

dfkt on April 18, 2007 7:24 AM

Kas: Cowon thought up a halfway decent solution for the FFWD/REW/skip issue in recent firmwares (as I wrote in the review above) – you can assign the volume +/- buttons to act as FFWD/REW/skip when the player is put in hold-mode. Means you gotta unlock the player for volume changes, and lock it to skip. It’s not the best, but still better than tapping around the touchscreen while the player is in your pocket.Seeing that the micro-USB connector for TV-out, line-in and charging has 9 pins, it should somehow be possible to get a remote running on that connector, but I don’t know if they laid out the pins for such an accessory.

scarpad on April 18, 2007 10:21 AM

The D2 is the Best Dap/PMP I’ve owned and I’ve owned alot of them, including now the Zen M/V and the A2. I have a question thou, I’m on FW 2.41, when Browsing my music it simply lists all the tracks in alpha order and not in original Album order. My Tracks have all been tagged in Media Monkey, I don’t see the reputed setting to choose between folder view anxd ID3 tags. How can I get the tracks in the correct order.

Pabeu on April 18, 2007 12:29 PM

Does someone know how iRiver Clix 2 (u20) sound quality compares to the one of the D2?Which would you buy?Thanx.

dfkt on April 18, 2007 3:07 PM

Without EQ and sound enhancements they probably are about the same sound quality. The D2 however has really good sounding BBE enhancements, while the Clix 2 only has mediocre (at best!) SRS-WOW stuff. SRS sounds horribly muddy and artificial, compared to the BBE enhancements, as used in Cowon players.

eazy3 on April 20, 2007 6:01 AM

this player is king………..i pisses on all the other players in the market….i wanna get one whn i have enuff cash.ive seen this player in black,white,green and red colours…..dunno if its true or photochopped.

Dave on April 20, 2007 3:54 PM

The presets radio can display radio name along with the frequency. Just edit “radio.ini” in system folder.

rhdwave on April 25, 2007 12:42 PM

Which external mic would be best to use with this?

Smith on April 29, 2007 1:31 AM

Great review.I hope DMB lands on US too…D2 can play “TV” using this device using DMB.I can’t wait

GSV3MiaC on April 29, 2007 11:32 AM

Green, Red etc. are only for the Korean (far east anyway) DMB enabled versions I believe. The rest of us get black or white.

banana on May 6, 2007 10:46 PM

is it true that battery life is halved when you use an sd/sdhc card?or if it’s not about how long is battery life with the card in use?

abhi on May 22, 2007 1:36 PM

This player or the Clix2 4gb or 8gb when it drops?is the .3 inches difference and the sd card expandability worth it?

Kate on June 7, 2007 10:55 PM

I just purchased the D2. It really is an awesome device. I couldn’t believe how easy it was to sync the music from the cds.This being my first mp3 player, I was hoping to get some assistance/advice on how to get my DVDs on the device. The instructions don’t explain it well at all (and I can program a DVD player without reading the instructions with no problem). I keep getting the error that it cannot read the format when I try to convert the video using the included software. Would it just be easier to purchase the cable in converter and record the DVD from the DVD player????

Sirocco on June 12, 2007 6:07 PM

I’m not sure touchscreens are the way to go, they don’t give the tactile response of buttons that click. Plus, and this isn’t a small thing, glass is fragile, and as glass surfaces become a bigger part of these devices, they become more and more fragile. At some point this makes them, ironically, less portable, ironic because portability is supposed to be their main selling point. And I wish the manufacturers of these products would include everything necessary to use in the box, like cases, AC adapters, screen protectors, etc. Please, give me everything in one package.

IC on June 23, 2007 1:33 PM

I have spent the day listening to the D2,X20, Clix2 and ipod (advancedmp3players have a shop in Glasgow) . I was heart set on X20 or Klick2. My priority was audio, I am not a purist but I do know quality when I hear it. There is absolutely no doubt that the D2 is miles better in terms of audio than the X20,Clix2, and the Nano. I bought the 4GB version and thinkit is superb. The user interface will not suit everyone but for me it is the music quality that counts. Superb product

Neal on June 28, 2007 3:30 AM

Damn, good review. Alot of critizing… which is a good thing actilly, since most D2 reviews favor the D2 too much to critize it.

cojones on July 3, 2007 4:08 PM

does the line-in recording cable come with the package??

dfkt on July 7, 2007 3:46 PM

No, as I wrote you have to buy it separately.

Baxter McCauley on July 11, 2007 1:18 PM

Great review. Thanks for the insight. I’m having a hard time deciding between Cowon D2, iriver clix2 or iriver X20. I need a gift for my g/f whose b/day is on July 26, but it doesn’t appear the clix2 8GB will be available by then. I want a small player that’s easy to use that has at least 8GB or can expand to that. However, your review says the Cowon D2 is not simple to use, so I probably won’t get the Cowan D2 for her. Maybe I’ll go with the X20 since the clix2 8GB isn’t available till next month.Where’s the best place to purchase the Cowon D2? That may be a better device for me.

alison on July 12, 2007 2:18 PM

The resume feature seems to work for me – have you tried pausing the track you’re listening to before you turn it off? See if that helps. Excellent review by the way – You’ve inspired me to get the D2 as well as the V-Moda Vibes Headphones – Thanks so much!

Scientist on July 30, 2007 11:09 PM

I’ve just bought a Cowon D2 and first impressions are positive though I want to become more familiar with it before drawing any conclusions, except one. I really like the plectrum-style stylus and have left it attached by its short but stretchy cord. More precise than using a finger and presumably this helps keep the screen clean. In terms of cluttering the clean lines of the D2 I don’t think its a problem and its is nothing compared to the aescetic impact of the ear phones. I wrap the ear phone cable around the D2, wrapping in the stylus, when not in use. The stylus is a soft plastic and I’m assuming that Cowon will have figured out that it won’t scratch the screen when in your pocket.

Zav on August 7, 2007 6:00 PM

Excellent review. i am unable to decide between IRiver Clix 2 and Cowon D2. These two players come in really close competition. Its touchscreen vs D-click interface. Fully supported flash player vs touch screen paint application. Expandable memory vs 8 GB for Clix 2. So.. i am unable to decide :(

Zav on August 7, 2007 6:01 PM

Excellent review. i am unable to decide between IRiver Clix 2 and Cowon D2. These two players come in really close competition. Its touchscreen vs D-click interface. Fully supported flash player vs touch screen paint application. Expandable memory vs 8 GB for Clix 2. So.. i am unable to decide :(

user on August 13, 2007 4:13 AM

Great review. D2 is an amazing device in terms of sound quality, battery life, support of various audio formats, customization, SD expansion, etc. There are a few niggles for me though:1. Touch screen is a real gimmic for me. At first it’s great to play with, including the paintbrush features, etc, however in real life it’s quite impractical. The physical buttons are small and placed in row, it’s difficult to blindly operate the most basic features such as skip track, play/pause or control the volume. I’d with it had a joystick like other Cowon players.2. The player is not robust enough, since you can’t really protect it in a pouch: the touch screen needs to be exposed anyway.3. I’d wish it could accept AA batteries like G3. AA are less sexy yet more practical for me, since I can take the player to some pronolgued journeys.In short, the ideal player for me would be G3 with a bit bigger screen + an SD expansion slot.

bill on August 17, 2007 3:00 PM

i bought one. i really like it. but i cannot get FLAC to be recognized.2.5 firmware. anyone else have this problem?

kuman on August 22, 2007 8:01 AM

Really great review sir, i bought it based on your words and i’m a believer :D haha, i got my D2 and i’m as happy as a clam XDits black coloured and got 4GbIt does everything i needs it to do comfortably, i wish it could do more, but i just couldnt shell out more cash with out sacrificing my well beingIt sounded really good, and i got some whole series (20+ eps) of cartoons in it.. i actually watch on it…one thing that really makes me proud… Its Not An IPOD… sorry guys i just have something against apple and their brand in general

hivi on August 27, 2007 8:06 PM

Bill,2.5 firmware has a buggy problem for playing FLAC. I confirmed it with Cowon’s email technical support. I’ve converted back to 2.45b. Albeit D2 seems to support FLAC, it works only 50% of the time (so, I have to convert the other FLAC to mp3). Reason unknown!I’ve noticed the more features added with the new firmware, e.g Notepad and Flash, the slower the startup time. By the way, just so you know, by using the external SD, the unit consumes more juice than of using built-in storage.Don’t expect much supports from the Cowon America, it’s terrible. Never be able to talk to a live support on phone as if none exists on this planet. Web supports keep pointing the customer support from site to site; if you like touring the internet, you wouldn’t be disappointed. The User Forum is not very helpful. However, the D2 is a great unit (as the review had faithfully commented) but the support… oh, boy don’t mention it!

Colin on August 29, 2007 5:52 PM

What’s the DAB like?

hivi on September 2, 2007 10:32 PM

Bill,I’ve just tested and found out why some FLAC (or APE) work and some don’t. It’s the matter of FLAC (or APE) compression rates. D2 works with the lowest (lower?) compression or D2 would freeze. So, you may need to manually convert from high compression to the lowest.However, It’s a different issue for firmware 2.5 that won’t work in any case.

hivi on September 2, 2007 10:33 PM

Bill,I’ve just tested and found out why some FLAC (or APE) work and some don’t. It’s the matter of FLAC (or APE) compression rates. D2 works with the lowest (lower?) compression or D2 would freeze. So, you may need to manually convert from high compression to the lowest.However, It’s a different issue for firmware 2.5 that won’t work in any case.

Pat on September 7, 2007 9:19 AM

Same question as Colin,anyone tried the DAB yet?

dfkt on September 11, 2007 8:06 AM

Hivi,as I understand it, only FLAC up to v1.1.3 is supported by older firmwares. For FLAC 1.1.4 and newer, only 3.51b might give decent results as of yet. Cowon sure needs to put more work in proper FLAC support on the D2…

frank on September 12, 2007 5:42 PM

The D2 is awesome,for those worried about fingerprints,well you can’t see them when the unit is switched on(anyway you can use the stylus)The sound is 100 times better than an ipod,and after 4 months continious use I have not got tired of using the touchscreen.given it’s size and weight it is very portable,and with the the on /off on standby I can flick fw/bw on songs/radio stations without taking it out of my pocket.My only gripe is that Cowon need to introduce some firmware so that movies can be zoomed in on like still pictures,and that they need to get the SDHC card showing on the menu screen.

daniel on September 14, 2007 4:12 AM

Slow at 35-40 megabytes/sec transfer rate? That seems pretty quick actually…Remember that the USB2 interface supports 480 megabits/set – megabits not megabytes, so at 8 bits per byte: 480/8 = 60 megabytes/sec max.A running antivirus could also explain this difference, but comparing this to my Sansa, I’d be happy to transfer data this quick :)

danny on September 18, 2007 12:16 AM

Martin,Thank you very much for your review, it’s definitely one of the best I’ve seen… I just ordered my D2 4GB. I got it primarily for the audio qualities. For me personally the sound quality is all that matters and I could live with a little inconvenience in terms of navigating through menus and so on. The combination of the BBE sound, the ability to play FLAC and the powerful 74mW got my undivided attention, together with the expandable SD memory. Who knows, maybe in a couple of years they’ll come out with a 32 gb card. I’ve also owned a Cowon X5 60gb and absolutely love it. I have all my music (about 50gb) archived in FLAC and I love the way I can just plug my X5 into my Onkyo receiver and enjoy my music in HiFi. Same in my car, I spent all that money for hi end speakers, amps, etc only to listen to crappy mp3s?? I could definitely tell the difference when I use a lossless codec. About Cowon’s support, I did have some dealings with them but when it was all said and done they came through and helped me out.I’m looking forward to my new D2, and Martin, thanks again!!

danny on September 18, 2007 12:17 AM

Martin,Thank you very much for your review, it’s definitely one of the best I’ve seen… I just ordered my D2 4GB. I got it primarily for the audio qualities. For me personally the sound quality is all that matters and I could live with a little inconvenience in terms of navigating through menus and so on. The combination of the BBE sound, the ability to play FLAC and the powerful 74mW got my undivided attention, together with the expandable SD memory. Who knows, maybe in a couple of years they’ll come out with a 32 gb card. I’ve also owned a Cowon X5 60gb and absolutely love it. I have all my music (about 50gb) archived in FLAC and I love the way I can just plug my X5 into my Onkyo receiver and enjoy my music in HiFi. Same in my car, I spent all that money for hi end speakers, amps, etc only to listen to crappy mp3s?? I could definitely tell the difference when I use a lossless codec. About Cowon’s support, I did have some dealings with them but when it was all said and done they came through and helped me out.I’m looking forward to my new D2, and Martin, thanks again!!

Cloom on September 27, 2007 2:04 AM

SO then…sounds like D2 is the way to go! Hoping to get one soon for my bday, but just b4 i do, i wanna check what people think of the new creative Zen: seems to have about the same, if not better, capabilities, but a bit of a higher price tag. Also, it is more memory, but i haven’t found any places that sell it yet :P

Phoenix-X on September 29, 2007 1:38 AM

well first time i read the review and i must say it is very detailed and does point out the bugs on it. I do think i’m going to get one of these but i’m waiting for the 8gb version of it. if it is announced please post about it or put it on the front page. Great review Martin/dfkt

Phoenix-X on September 29, 2007 1:39 AM

well first time i read the review and i must say it is very detailed and does point out the bugs on it. I do think i’m going to get one of these but i’m waiting for the 8gb version of it. if it is announced please post about it or put it on the front page. Great review Martin/dfkt

Cailen Engelhart on September 30, 2007 2:01 AM

I was wondering does anybody know if I should get this or the Sony NWZ-A810

Artofwar420 on September 30, 2007 2:52 AM

I think I just found my new mp3 player, it’s got everything that I ever wanted and more, I’m sure the kinks will be worked out in future firmware updates, you’ve made me a believer!

erik on October 3, 2007 7:18 AM

There is a very nice “shuffle” bug. My cowon 2.50 is able to play shuffle only in one folder. The other modes simply do not work ….. grr

psylence on October 18, 2007 12:34 PM

I’m owing a 1Gb Cowon G3 player now and it’s definietly great device – extremely big play time and using AA batterie is really comfortable. But now, I’ve started listening to a lots of FLAC/APE music and I’m thinking about buying a player with lossless support and more memory.It’s a pity that Cowon closed up their ‘G’ branch – people will always need cheap players with long-lasting playtime. I’m agree to user saying ‘In short, the ideal player for me would be G3 with a bit bigger screen + an SD expansion slot.’ – that’s exactly my case (adding lossless support, of course, but it seems now all player manufacturers will do this).I’ve read many D2 reviews and now I’m ordering it in E-shop, because extremely long play time, tradionally great sound quality and a possibility to have 12 (!) Gigs of Flash memory (i don’t like big, weighty and unreliable HDD players) – all of these are great.

Wazootyman on November 8, 2007 3:37 PM

An excellent review of a spectacular-sounding player. I had almost resigned myself to purchasing a more expensive HDD-based PMP, but then I stumbled across the D2. Despite the fair criticisms in this review, it sounds like the D2 has absolutely everything I’m looking for, at an incredibly attractive price (I found the 2GB version on sale for a measly $139.99 CAD on NCIX.com). The SD memory slot seals the deal for me; I’m ordering this today!

r on November 18, 2007 1:42 PM

This player is available in canada computers (brick & mortar) in well, Canada.

Phoenix-X on November 26, 2007 11:38 PM

anyone know if any store all accross canada sells the d2?

TechyguyDR on November 28, 2007 7:33 PM

The D@ is actually available at one B&M store in the US. The thing is that it’s only store is NYC (well I live in NYC so that’s a good thing lol). They have the 2 gig model at $139.95!

Puffy on December 2, 2007 2:57 PM

What store in nyc is it in?:OO

Kanuk on December 4, 2007 1:44 PM

At least one company is selling the D2 in Canada: http://www.ncix.com

TechyGuyDR on December 8, 2007 10:10 AM

Puffy it’s B & H Photo and Video. I got mine there yesterday.

unreal4u on December 9, 2007 3:23 PM

wow … that’s a great review !! One of the best reviews i have ever seen :) Anyway… anybody has compared the iAudio U3 vs the B2 ? Which one has better sound quality ?Greetings and thanks again for such quality review ! :D

cmsanto on December 11, 2007 9:46 AM

“However, if you want a simple, easy-to-operate audio player, then the D2 is probably not the right one for you.”Thanks for the great review.Do you have a recommendation on other players that may have the same high audio quality as this player?thanks.

worldman on December 12, 2007 8:03 PM

Why don’t you try the Cowon iAudio 7? It supposedly has same high audio quality with even longer 60 hours of battery life and it comes in a 16GB model if you want. The one thing the iAudio 7 does not have is a nice video screen and no DAB or DMB.

ontask on December 23, 2007 11:26 AM

Excellent review! The variable playback speed feature is HUGE for audiobook users – as long as the voice pitch isn’t too “mickey mouse”ish we love the fast speed.I’ve been searching for a review on this feature for weeks – yours is the most information I’ve found.Your review is my last research stop – 99.9% of my questions answered – off to newegg.com for their combo deal and ebay for the accessories package!Thanks for providing the information to make a comfortable buying decision! (and Merry Xmas!)

Scott on December 31, 2007 11:33 AM

I have never owned a digital media player. I run only Linux at home, and I received an 80gb ipod for Christmas. Before I opened it I started researching compatibility. Didn’t take long for me to decide to return the ipod. I went and bought an 80gb Archos 605 and tried it out for a few days but decided that it was way beyond what I needed, and too fragile due to the HDD. Nice device though, and worked flawlessly with Linux.I have settled on the D2 for a few reasons. Linux, Audio quality, codec support (FLAC and Ogg Vorbis) and size. The SD slot was the deciding factor between the D2 and the iAudio 7.Ordered yesterday from NCIX.com. They had the best price of any retailer in Canada. Looking forward to not having a stack of trashed CDs in my car.HAPPY NEW YEAR!

MikeC on January 3, 2008 4:46 PM

My question is similar to cmsanto’s. I’m looking for a portable audio player. Priorities are sound quality and storage space. Price is not an issue. Should I buy this or the new Zune? Anyone. Thanks.

Orlando on January 4, 2008 11:56 PM

mi question is simple whish Cowon can be able to download music direcly from Cd player’ o Radio estation. or my Old Vinildisc

Orlando on January 5, 2008 12:00 AM

please tell me wish Mp3 or Mp4 player are Able to record music directly from any Radio estations or Cd player’s

Orlando on January 5, 2008 12:01 AM

please tell me wish Mp3 or Mp4 player are Able to record music directly from any Radio estations or Cd player’s

rigidkitchen on January 11, 2008 5:01 PM

Firmware 2.51 adds functionality for sleep timer – increased from 60 minutes to 120 minutes. Seems like they paid attention to this review! Very good player.http://www.cowonamerica.com/download/cowon_rn_d2.html#251

Barbara on January 17, 2008 12:30 AM

What is anyone’s experience with audible.com and a D2? I have given up on iRiver service. Great devices when they work; worthless if they need replacement or repair.

Barbara on January 17, 2008 11:32 PM

Let me answer my own question. The D2 came. Uploading the firmware so that it would accept Audible worked as the direction said it would. Recognition of the unit by Audible worked as well. Books downloaded as they should. (Being experienced with audible.com helped.) AND, contrary to the reviews that I read that said that it would not pause and pick up where it left off, I am finding that this works fine as well. (If you leave this book and come back to it at a later point, it is probably not book marked but that is not a show stopped. You can always fast forward to where you left off and the inherent audible break points work as they should). All in all, this should work fine for audible books.

Barbara on January 17, 2008 11:32 PM

Let me answer my own question. The D2 came. Uploading the firmware so that it would accept Audible worked as the direction said it would. Recognition of the unit by Audible worked as well. Books downloaded as they should. (Being experienced with audible.com helped.) AND, contrary to the reviews that I read that said that it would not pause and pick up where it left off, I am finding that this works fine as well. (If you leave this book and come back to it at a later point, it is probably not book marked but that is not a show stopped. You can always fast forward to where you left off and the inherent audible break points work as they should). All in all, this should work fine for audible books.

Barbara on January 17, 2008 11:33 PM

Let me answer my own question. The D2 came. Uploading the firmware so that it would accept Audible worked as the direction said it would. Recognition of the unit by Audible worked as well. Books downloaded as they should. (Being experienced with audible.com helped.) AND, contrary to the reviews that I read that said that it would not pause and pick up where it left off, I am finding that this works fine as well. (If you leave this book and come back to it at a later point, it is probably not book marked but that is not a show stopped. You can always fast forward to where you left off and the inherent audible break points work as they should). All in all, this should work fine for audible books.

Noyon on January 24, 2008 12:58 PM

I have this D2 4gb with an 8GB sd card! its simply awesome! great audio quality, best battery life of all other mp3 players out there. i don’t even understand why people buy ipods when there are SO MUCH better alternatives like this one? Cowon makes some of the best sounding digital audio players. i wish they advertised and publicized more!cowon ROCKS!!!!

Andrew on January 30, 2008 8:50 AM

After reading this review and others, I just bought a 4gig D2, and I really like it. It works fine for me with FLAC, and I like how I can use Winamp to manage the music files on it. The sound quality really is excellent. I just ordered the line-in adapter so I can record from the mixing board from my band. I’m looking forward to hearing the sound quality of those recordings.

nywytboy68 on February 1, 2008 2:01 PM

I have a D2 8gb w/8gb sdhc card and a Cassini theme loaded and its THE BEST! Just one yhing though, do not upgrade to the 2.54 firmware as there have been many probs w/this. It nearly bricked my D2! I reinstalled the 2.51 firmware and will stay put untill bugs are worked out. That is my only complaint about the player as Cowon has a habit of releasing buggy firmware (check out the forums on ABI and see). Otherwise, it’s the best of my collection (next to the sound quality of my Sony NWZ-S618 that is). Full featured and great media capabilities. PS: I love ABI – Keep Up The Good Work!!!

Dave on February 20, 2008 6:30 PM

Im new and have never had an MP3 before. Thinking about this D2 or the new Creative Zen. I have a Mac and the Cowon is supposed to work with Mac. I dont even know the lingo so the review is like reading Braille to me. Is this a good starter or should I try the Zen or something less sophisticated?

adytzu on February 26, 2008 8:53 AM

I don’t understand: it’s 2 variants of D2??One of them with DAB/DMB and another without this?I just put a order for 8Gb D2, but I cannot see nothing about DAB in the specification.

EnzoTen (Grahm) on March 2, 2008 10:58 AM

comments closed.Please continue discussion and help in our Cowon iAudio D2 Forum.

Comments Closed. Please continue the discussion in the forums