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  #1  
Old 06-25-2008, 04:56 PM
L4Latte L4Latte is offline
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Default Using the Pilot with a component stereo system

Hello everyone!
(Thanks so far for all of your info and help with my other questions in another post of mine here!)

So, I come to you today with a few more questions ...

Hehehe ... I've gone a little "cable crazy" with regards to my Pilot ...

I got two different cables that somehow I think will allow me to use my Pilot with my component stereo system:
1) a 6 ft cable with a 3.5mm (1/8") jack at one end and a 6.3mm (1/4") jack at the other end
2) a 6 ft cable with a 3.5mm (1/8") jack at one end and dual RCA outputs at the other end

Now that I have these cables in hand, now I'm wondering how exactly or what exactly I can do between my Pilot and the stereo system ...

For one scenario, I imagine somehow I can play my Pilot's music through the speakers connected to the stereo system (just not sure which of the 2 cables I would need to use).
Another scenario, I imagine somehow I could record from, say, the cassette tape deck or the record turntable to the Pilot (again, just not sure which cable to use).
Perhaps there might also be a way to record FM radio as it's transmitted through the stereo system (which, with its antenna system picks up a clearer and broader range of radio stations) (again, which cable to use?).
Any other nifty things I could do between the Pilot and the stereo system that you can think of?

Any and all help here, as always, will be greatly appreciated!
Looking forward to responses!
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  #2  
Old 06-25-2008, 08:42 PM
semiquaver semiquaver is offline
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For playing music through the speakers, just use the RCA adapter to plug into the RCA inputs on your system (should be labeled LINE IN or AUX) then choose that selector on the system. This method works for any device with a headphone output like an ipod or a tape player.

For recording, use the same cable, but plug it into a set of output rca jacks on your system and into the center insignia headphone jack, then just open the recording application and press play.

The 1/4" converter could, I guess, let you play music through a guitar amp.
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  #3  
Old 06-26-2008, 12:18 PM
Danbk Danbk is offline
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...the more I read you post, the more I keep asking different questions to myself....

Using the RCA cable to input to the stereo is by far the better choice. the 1/4" would work if you dont have and extra inputs (LINE IN) available. For sound quality, unless you have major money tied up in your stereo / speakers, you will not notice any difference.
Going from a tape deck or phono is where I go goofy....(see above) Both of these "styles of playback" are noisy as ever as it is. You could take those signals into a computer first, clean them up (Acid is GREAT for that) and then pull into the player. If you did go straight from phone to the player, you would hear the record pops & noises (and thats bad!!) Also, I am not sure that the player could record that long the input from either the phono or tape deck signal (Anyone?? What IS the lenght of recording the Pilot can do?)
(Aka... I am kind of a stereo (all seperates) geek kind of person so I know the in's & out's of how to hook up to stereos. Did some weird stuff in-house and cars in my time... All legal too BTW....)
Hope it helps for what its worth.
See YA!!!
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  #4  
Old 06-26-2008, 02:55 PM
L4Latte L4Latte is offline
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OK ... Thanks for the responses so far!

With my component stereo system, all of the parts (the turntable, the cassette deck, etc) are connected to a receiver. The receiver has an equalizer, a 1/4" (6.3mm) headphone input, and an "A/B" speaker button panel.

In regards to recording from the stereo system to the Pilot ...

Per the responses so far ...
The best bet would be for me to disregard the stereo system as a whole unit and, say, if I wanted to record from the turntable, I should just connect directly to the turntable using the cable with the dual RCA outputs and the 1/8" (3.5mm) jack.

But then, there's the pops, hisses, noise, etc. that come with the use of a turntable that should be factored in here somewhere.

For that reason, wouldn't it actually be better to record from the turntable not directly but through the receiver where the sound quality could be equalized (to a point)? In which case, I would think that I should use the other cable with the 1/4" (6.3mm) jack plugged into the receiver's headphone output and the 1/8" (3.5mm) jack plugged into the line-in of the Pilot.

In part, that's why I bought both of the cables ... but then I didn't know really what would be the best way to go about things ... This is my dilemma, hehehe ...

Any thoughts/comments?
Thanks!
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  #5  
Old 06-26-2008, 04:39 PM
mark541 mark541 is offline
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Quote:
1) a 6 ft cable with a 3.5mm (1/8") jack at one end and a 6.3mm (1/4") jack at the other end
2) a 6 ft cable with a 3.5mm (1/8") jack at one end and dual RCA outputs at the other end
To play music from the Pilot through the stereo, you'll need to use adapter #2 to connect from the Pilot line-out to the RCA jacks marked tape-in, aux-in or any other RCA input connectors (but NOT the phono input).

The 1/4" headphone jack on your receiver is an output, not an input, so you could use it with your adapter #1 to record whatever is playing on the stereo to your Pilot. If you want to be able to easily adjust the sound levels and equalization from the stereo to the Pilot, then you could use adapter #1 to connect the stereo 1/4" headphone output to the 1/8" line-in on the Pilot.

To record output that has not been altered (either by volume or equalizer), use adapter #2 and connect the RCA jacks on the receiver "tape out" (or something similar) and connect the 1/8" to the line-in on the Pilot.

Unless your turntable has a built-in preamp, you should not connect it directly to the Pilot. Receivers with "Phono" inputs should have a built-in phono preamp (some new receivers no longer come with this). Some (but not many) turntables do have the preamp built in, you'd need to verify that.

Danbk is right in that you may want to record your LPs and cassettes onto your PC and use that to clean up the recording to reduce "hiss", "clicks" and "pops".

My recommendation for a good sound editor is Audacity. Audacity is open source and free, plus it works on Linux, MS Windows and Mac OS X.

I recommend recording to your PC any music where you want to keep a permanent copy. For temporary or one-time copies, then sure, you could record directly to the Pilot. After all, the recording capability of the Pilot is fairly limited.

Any recording you make will only be as good as the weakest link. That may be the Pilot, the source (FM, LP or cassette), your stereo or your PC sound card.

To record on your PC;
1. Temporarily disconnect the cable connected to the receiver line-out. It should be the one connected to the cassette deck line-in. Leave the line-in on the receiver (connected to the cassette line-out) if you want to record from the cassette player.
2. Connect adapter #2 with the RCA connected to the receiver line-out to your PC sound card 1/8" line-in.
3. Start your sound editor, open a new recording in the PC sound editor, then start recording.
4. Start the music on the stereo (cassette or turntable).
5. At the end of the music, stop recording. I recommend saving the initial file as a flac or wav, giving it a temporary name. That way, if you mess up during the edit, you can start over without rerecording.
6. Edit the recorded file, removing "hiss", "clicks" and "pops", and remove any "dead air" at the beginning and end of the recording. If you're doing a lot of editing, save intermediate steps with temporary names too.
7. Save the final file as a flac (*.flac) file if you want a lossless copy, otherwise save as Ogg Vorbis (*.ogg) or MP3 (*.mp3).

Good luck and have fun!
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  #6  
Old 06-27-2008, 06:26 AM
semiquaver semiquaver is offline
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No disrespect intended to the OP, but Mark, It's probably not a good idea to tell a person who has trouble connecting an mp3 player to a stereo to save in flac or ogg, which he'll have a very hard time playing in the most common media players (not to mention the lack of flac support in the Pilot itself). What's more, audacity doesn't even come with mp3 support installed due to licensing issues; you have to manually download the LAME binaries then extract them into the plugins folder, which I suspect isn't going to happen in this case.

L4Latte: A full fledged audio editing suite like audacity or soundforge is going to be overkill here (and ACID was suggested, but is a loop-based sequencer, which has almost nothing to do with removing hiss). I'd look for a decent fully automated solution for cleaning up audio, many of which exist, and many cost money.

Personally, I like the hiss and pops in my converted vinyls. That's the only reason I converted them instead of buying the CD/mp3s. If you opt not to clean up the files, you can bypass the PC entirely and just record to the pilot, which would be infinitely simpler and would yield files you could play immediately.
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  #7  
Old 06-27-2008, 01:21 PM
mark541 mark541 is offline
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The reason I recommend saving in flac format would be to have a base copy of the the file, I would make a transcoded copy in ogg format for use on the Pilot. If any transcoding to other formats was needed in the future, then by using the flac file you would not lose quality.

Regarding mp3 files and using LAME binaries, you are correct about that. I don't encode to mp3 myself, I prefer the freedom of the vorbis formats (ogg and flac). Support of ogg files was a deciding factor in my purchase of the Pilot.
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  #8  
Old 06-30-2008, 11:42 AM
Danbk Danbk is offline
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Here's the EASIEST thing to do for all questions:

Download ALL needed already in MP3 format!!! Do it yourself or have one of your buddies do it for you and give him a case of his favorite beer!!

(..L4Latte, just busting balls...!!!!)
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  #9  
Old 07-02-2008, 02:50 PM
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mattschuette mattschuette is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark541 View Post
I prefer the freedom of the vorbis formats (ogg and flac).
<pedantic>
Ogg is the container format. Vorbis is a lossy audio codec. FLAC is a lossless audio codec. Ogg Vorbis is Vorbis audio that happens to be in an Ogg container. Other codecs that can be contained in Ogg are Theora (video), Speex (speech).
</pedantic>

These are all free and open source. Anyone interested should visit Xiph for more information, including compatible apps and devices.
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