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Old 10-16-2010, 02:36 PM
W124CE W124CE is offline
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Default how to play clip+ in car

kill me for saying this, the only example i have is through the ipod ,with sticking an adapter in the lighter and tuning it to a sttation on the radio.

any ideas on what I need to play my mp3 in my car?
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Old 10-16-2010, 05:55 PM
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FreeZ5 FreeZ5 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W124CE View Post
kill me for saying this, the only example i have is through the ipod ,with sticking an adapter in the lighter and tuning it to a sttation on the radio.

any ideas on what I need to play my mp3 in my car?
Same idea will work. Stick a plug in the headphone jack, turn the volume up to max, and plug the other end in some how. An FM transmitter will work, especially if you're not in an area with a lot of FM stations. I use a cassette adapter (lucky me to have a car that still has a cassette deck). Some decks have a jack on the faceplate. Other card radios have some other kind of adpter thru the back of the deck.

Steve
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Old 10-16-2010, 06:03 PM
Mikerman Mikerman is offline
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It's the same for all digital audio players of the same general type (SanDisk Clip, Clip+ and Fuze, iRiver players, Apple players, etc.):

1. Preferred way, for the best sound: connect the player's line-out jack, if there is one, or earphone jack to an auxiliary-in jack on your car head-unit (stereo). Many cars/car stereos have aux-in jacks nowadays, and many car stereos can have one added (it would be a cable with a connection jack at the end which attaches to the back of the car stereo and then snakes down behind the dash to where you want the connection jack placed).

2. Via cassette adapter: If your car stereo has a cassette player, you can use a cassette adapter, which looks just like a cassette and goes into the stereo's cassette slot, and then has a cable that snakes out the cassette slot which you plug in to your audio player.

3. As you noted, via a car fm radio frequency gizmo.

Definitely, #1 is the way to go, if possible. And the price of replacement car stereos really has come down, so that you easily can find them (and nice models) for $100-$200, or less.

And if you want to replace your car stereo yourself, it really is easy enough to do and possible for us mere mortals (even I was able to do it, in 1-2 hours--less time than if I took my car in to a shop). Crutchfield.com is a great source for car stereos, with lots of information and decent (although not the lowest) prices; even if you find a lower price on a stereo elsewhere and buy from that source, you still can buy, at low cost, a car stereo replacement kit from Crutchfield, which gives you the simple tools you will need for the replacement job and, importantly, step-by-step directions for your specific model of car on how to do the job--you also get a toll-free number to call if you have any question in the process (and the people at the other end of the line are knowledgable). Highly recommended!
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