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  #3061  
Old 02-15-2010, 04:07 PM
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Apparently the next album is called I'll scratch Yours, where Paul Simon, Radiohead, Neil Young et al each cover a Gabriel track.

So it's artists who are still alive.

Couldn't be worse - this is music to hang yourself to.
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  #3062  
Old 02-17-2010, 11:14 AM
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Jackson Browne faced the nearly insurmountable task of following a masterpiece in making his second album. Having cherry-picked years of songwriting the first time around, he turned to some of his secondary older material, which was still better than most people's best and, ironically, more accessible -- notably such songs as "These Days," which had been covered six times already, dating back to Nico's Chelsea Girl album in 1967, and "Take It Easy," a co-composition with the Eagles' Glenn Frey, which had been a Top 40 hit for the group in 1972. Brown unsuccessfully looked for another hit single with the uptempto "Red Neck Friend," reminisced about meeting his wife and starting a family in the coy "Ready or Not," and, at the end, finally came up with a new song to rank with those on the first album in the philosophical title track, which reportedly was his more positive reply to Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young's "Wooden Ships." (David Crosby sang harmony). Musically, the album was still restrained, but not as austere as Jackson Browne, as the singer had hooked up with multi-instrumentalist David Lindley, who would introduce interesting textures to his music on a variety of stringed instruments for the next several years. All of which is to say that For Everyman was a less consistent collection than Browne's debut album. But Browne's songwriting ability remained impressive. * * * *
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  #3063  
Old 02-17-2010, 11:27 AM
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Moonsorrow - Kivenkantaja



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Originally Posted by SputnikMusic - 4.5/5
Summary: Summary - Don the nearest suit of chain mail, equip sword and shield, and mount noble steed, it’s time for Viking metal’s finest, and you best be prepared.
Moonsorrow had already made a name for themselves in the folk and Viking metal community. Their 2001 releases Suden Uni and Voimasta ja Kunnasta showcased the Finnish quintet’s knack for beautiful and groovy melody, quaint folk influences, and all things epic, yet in spire of these two albums, they hadn’t quite been able to muster the means to present their dedicated listeners with the sound they were waiting for. But fear not, ye olde metallers, these musical warriors staged their triumphant return in 2003 with a more refined sound and crisper recording quality that proved to be an aural experience of epic proportions. Sure it might be goofy, but goddamn, goofy never sounded so good.

Moonsorrow slate their name and purpose right from the get go; the thunderous beginning rhythms of “Rauniolla” seem to speak for themselves. Scattered throughout the album are such bursts of powerful progressions and pounding sonic assaults. Yeah, they may be simple, but they do a bang up job of engaging the listener and keeping the songs moving by providing dynamic contrast and support for the melody. Speaking of melody, it takes center stage and proves to be the most interesting and engaging aspect of the music. It’s both driving and serene, simultaneously imbuing the listener with a terrifying bloodlust while lulling him into a state of tranquil admiration. That’s not all, folks, amidst the slew of power chords, group chanting, and melodies, Moonsorrow incorporate a unique folk element, both quirky and eerily enticing.

The guitar work is spot-on on this album, providing the compelling progressions and rhythms that outfit the music with the high energy one would expect. The ambition and sheer enormity of Moonsorrow’s package are also best demonstrated by the band’s presentation of the guitars. Moonsorrow combines electric, acoustic, and 12-string guitars, which makes for a pretty formidable wall of sound. No worries though, these instruments are used tastefully, and the result never overwhelms the listener, but instead makes it all the easier to lose himself in the music. When the guitars aren’t chugging along with rhythmic precision and variety, they occasionally take the spotlight and loose some pretty righteous riffs, such as in the album’s third track, “Jumalten Kaupunki / Tuhatvuotinen Perinto.” These licks appear without warning, capturing the same compelling quality of the band’s great chord progressions, and then they vanish as quickly and artfully as they came, leaving the listener wanting more. Their existence is ephemeral, but your neck is guaranteed to be pretty worn out by the time they’re gone.

On this particular release, the vocals and keyboards are responsible for the majority of the melody, and when the two are combined, the outcome is simply stunning. The keyboards can be heard not only in the traditional synth sound, but they also appear as the resounding call of trumpets and the soft timbre of flutes. The vocals are just as impressive and awe-inspiring. Performed by three members, the clean vocals and chants are simply beautiful, and give the songs huge amount of energy. The harsh vocals, cries belted from Sopvali’s pipes, are also quite good, and seem genuine and free from added effects. Both parts of the music are superb, and play an integral role in making the sound what it is, a sound to be revered.

Drummer Marko Tarvonen also delivers a solid performance on the album, and is an outstanding example of the truly supportive player. His chief role is to help shape the songs dynamically, and he does so to a “t,” attacking the crash cymbal with the fury of a Viking crew lacking mead when the music calls for it, and backing off when the melody needs to be heard. He’s no pushover however, his feet be nimble and quick and he can tear up the tom toms with considerable aptitude.

As for downsides, the album doesn’t have too many. For listeners with attention spans on the shorter end of the spectrum, you may want to steer clear of this band entirely; the average song clocks in at about ten minutes. Length aside, Kivenkantaja’s only real fault is its somewhat anticlimactic close. The album could have used an epic finale, urging the listener to immediately press the play button once more. However, Moonsorrow opt for the soothing sounds of “Matkan Lopussa” instead. The track order could have been better, but it isn’t of such large concern that it really detracts from the album overall.

So there you have it. Pop this baby in your CD player and prepare for quite the journey. Set sail on your vessel of rape and pilfering and make your way for Newfoundland. For the rest of us without such authentic and historically accurate vessels, shopping carts from the local grocery or department store will do just fine.


One of my favourite albums, from my favourite band!
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  #3064  
Old 02-17-2010, 01:58 PM
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Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
It's hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record. There are a couple (very good) covers, with "Corrina Corrina" and "Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance," but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since "Blowin' in the Wind," "Masters of War," and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" weren't just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic. Although they've proven resilient throughout the years, if that's all Freewheelin' had to offer, it wouldn't have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy ("Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"), gorgeous love songs ("Girl From the North Country"), and cheerfully absurdist humor ("Bob Dylan's Blues," "Bob Dylan's Dream") with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it.
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  #3065  
Old 02-18-2010, 01:40 PM
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Following the break-up of The Smiths in 1987 at the height of their creative powers and popularity, Morrissey lost his co-writer Johnny Marr in what is considered one of the most productive partnerships in British pop, leaving many to doubt his ability to continue. In February '88 Morrissey silenced his doubters with the release of his debut solo single 'Suedehead'; a slice of urgent, shimmering guitar-pop, featuring the Durutti Column's Vini Reilly and produced by Stephen Street. It went to No. 5 in the UK Singles Chart. This was followed by the No. 9 single 'Everyday Is Like Sunday', considered by many his greatest song and described by the NME, in its Year in Review, as "The best No. 1 '88 never gave us." Morrissey's inimitable solo career had begun with two timeless, Top 10 singles.

Beginning with 'Suedehead', HMV/Parlophone Singles '88 – '95 runs chronologically and consists of 19 incredible singles - 10 of which were non-album releases - b/w not just brilliant b-sides, but some of Moz's most-loved songs ever. As well as his first two singles, it also includes the highly acclaimed 'The Last Of The Famous…', 'November Spawned A Monster', 'Piccadilly Palare' and 'Pregnant For The Last Time', the first single to feature his ongoing collaborator and musical director Boz Boorer who, along with guitarist Alain Whyte, added an American Rockabilly sound to Moz's distinctive jangle pop.

After the success of these singles, Morrissey recorded an album – 1992's Your Arsenal - with one of his heroes, Mick Ronson, former David Bowie collaborator and member of The Spiders From Mars. The three singles from this album – 'We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful', 'You're The One For Me, Fatty' and 'Certain People I Know' – are all included. This was followed by what's considered by many his greatest album - and final for Parlophone - Vauxhall and I, with singles 'The More You Ignore Me The Closer I Get' and 'Hold On To Your Friends'. Also included is the 1994 duet with Siouxsie Sioux, 'Interlude', and non-album singles 'Boxers' and 'Sunny', which indicated the direction Morrissey would take on his next album, Southpaw Grammar.

All the b-sides released in this seven-year period are included: 35 studio recordings and seven live recordings. They include the fan-favourite 'Sister I'm A Poet'; the self-deprecating 'Disappointed'; Moz's witty jibe at The Rolling Stones, 'Get Off The Stage'; his tribute to The Jam in his reworking of 'That's Entertainment'; an exquisite cover of indie-skinhead band Bradford's 'Skin Storm'; the gorgeous 'Used To Be A Sweet Boy'; Moz's exploration of London's underbelly, 'Have-A-Go Merchant' and 'Black-Eyed Susan'; an affecting version of 'Moonriver', and many, many more. There are live versions of The Smiths' 'Sweet And Tender Hooligan' (recorded at Morrissey's first-ever solo concert), T-Rex's 'Cosmic Dancer', and Viva Hate's 'Alsatian Cousin', amongst others.



Disc 1:

Suedehead
I Know Very Well How I Got My Name
Hairdresser On Fire
Oh Well I'll Never Learn
Everyday Is Like Sunday
Sister I'm A Poet
Disappointed
Will Never Marry
The Last Of The Famous International Playboys
Lucky Lisp
Michael's Bones
Interesting Drug
Such A Little Thing Makes Such A Big Difference
Sweet And Tender Hooligan (live, Wolverhampton Civic Hall, 22/12/88)
Oujia Board, Oujia Board
Yes I Am Blind
East West
November Spawned A Monster
He Knows I'd Love To See Him
Girl Least Likely To
Piccadilly Palare
Get Off The Stage
At Amber

Disc 2:

Our Frank
Journalists Who Lie
Tony The Pony
Sing Your Life
That's Entertainment
The Loop
Pregnant For The Last Time
Skin Storm
Cosmic Dancer (live, Utrecht, Holland 01/05/91)
Disappointed (live, Utrecht, Holland 01/05/91)
My Love Life
I've Changed My Plea To Guilty
There's A Place In Hell For Me And My Friends
We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful
Suedehead (live, Hammersmith Odeon, 04/10/91)
I've Changed My Plea To Guilty (live, Hammersmith Odeon, 04/10/91)
Pregnant For The Last Time (live, Hammersmith Odeon, 04/10/91)
Alsatian Cousin (live, Hammersmith Odeon, 04/10/91)
You're The One For Me, Fatty
Pashernate Love
There Speaks A True Friend

Disc 3:

Certain People I Know
Jack The Ripper
You've Had Her
The More You Ignore Me The Closer I Get
Used To Be A Sweet Boy
I'd Love To
Hold On To Your Friends
Moonriver
Moonriver (extended)
Interlude (Morrissey with Siouxsie)
Interlude (extended)
Interlude (instrumental)
Boxers
Have-A-Go Merchant
Whatever Happens, I Love You
Sunny
Black-Eyed Susan
Swallow On My Neck

Last edited by Dreamnine; 02-18-2010 at 01:45 PM.
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  #3066  
Old 02-20-2010, 05:42 PM
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Last edited by Dreamnine; 02-21-2010 at 07:03 AM.
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  #3067  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:51 AM
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Nine Inch Nails - With Teeth (2005)


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Trent Reznor always was a perfectionist, laboring over his final mixes with a fine-tooth comb, a belabored process that inevitably led to long gaps between albums. About five years a piece, actually, a wait that was sustainable between his 1989 debut, Pretty Hate Machine, and his 1994 breakthrough, The Downward Spiral; a wait, considering the expectations, that was understandable between that record and its 1999 sequel, The Fragile; yet it was a wait that was a little bewildering and frustrating between that record and its long-gestating follow-up, With Teeth. The Fragile was a grandiose, indulgent double album, dense enough to alienate fairweather fans while making advocates of those with enough time, patience, and fanaticism to listen to it repeatedly until it all made sense. It may not have pleased everybody, but it seemed like a record that necessitated half a decade to construct, and arrived with an appropriate sense of drama. That's not the case with With Teeth, which appeared in the spring of 2005 with the requisite deluge of press but without the sense of breathless anticipation that greeted The Fragile. Part of that was changing times -- fans who were 25 in 1999 were now 30 and weren't following pop music as closely -- but it's also true that the double-disc set whittled his audience down to its core, diminishing Nine Inch Nails' stature somewhat. They still had their cult and still won accolades from those convinced that artists who were important in 1995 were still important in 2005, but NIN seems not only out of step but diminished in 2005. Sure, Rick Rubin had Johnny Cash sing "Hurt," but Reznor's recordings seemed to have less impact on modern music than ever. His soundalikes vanished, his long-abandoned protégé Marilyn Manson turned the corner from self-parody to college lecturer, his romanticized goth morphed into Hot Topic stores and Evanescence. Not that any of this mattered one bit to Reznor. Instead of grabbing the gold ring when he had a chance in 1995, he squirreled himself away in his New Orleans house, recording obsessively, and according to some interviews conducted around the release of With Teeth, succumbing to alcohol addiction. He consciously turned away from stardom, along with anything happening in contemporary pop, so he could tinker in the studio. That lead to the obsessive, insular The Fragile, and that same impulse drives the sleek, streamlined, diamond-hard With Teeth.

Quite frankly, this is the record that NIN should have released if Reznor had wanted to capitalize on the success of The Downward Spiral. It's loud and angry, doesn't skimp on hooks, and is heavy on both sexy robotic dance beats and crashing rock rhythms (some supplied by everybody's favorite drummer, Dave Grohl, but not that you'd know it from reading the CD; the chintzy packaging not only has no credits, it has no booklet) -- all things that made "Closer" an alt-rock classic. But for all the surface similarities to his past albums, there is a palpable difference in tone and approach on With Teeth. This is the work of a craftsman, a musician who meticulously assembles his work by layering details so densely, there's never a moment on the record where something isn't roiling under the surface, where something isn't added to the mix. He's good at this, though. With Teeth is an impressive achievement technically and the music is generally strong, yet there's a nagging problem -- namely, there's nothing new here. It's not that Reznor is recycling himself -- he's far too compulsive a craftsman for that -- but he's not pushing himself, either, preferring to work within the box he created himself ten years ago. Consequently, the music sounds as if it comfortably could have been released in 1996, the time when Reznor's style of music was at its popular peak. There's nothing wrong with that -- plenty of rock and pop musicians are craftsmen, working the same sound and finding interesting variations within it -- but there's something awkward about an industrial craftsman, or at least as how it's practiced by Reznor. His biggest problem is that while he shows considerable skill, even subtlety, in his music, the tortured sentiments of his lyrics are frozen in amber. They're eternally adolescent and they sound juvenile, even embarrassing, coming from a man on the verge of his 40th birthday. These words work when sung by a young man, when they're sung with a sense of urgency, but "urgency" is not a word that can be associated with NIN, even on a record like this that takes great pains to sound visceral and alive. Reznor is too insulated, too shut out from the outside world, too unconcerned with pleasing anybody but himself to make anything close to urgent. Without that sense of hunger, his music doesn't have mass appeal, leaving it to the hardcore who appreciate his sense of craft and construction, listeners who are eager to listen to the album enough times to memorize the details. In short, the same listeners who had the patience to learn how to love The Fragile will learn how to love With Teeth.
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  #3068  
Old 02-21-2010, 10:08 AM
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  #3069  
Old 02-21-2010, 07:22 PM
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Audioslave - Out of Exile (2005) = 4/5 Stars.


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Given that most supergroups last little longer than a single album, it was easy to assume that Audioslave — the pairing of Soundgarden vocalist Chris Cornell and the instrumental trio at the core of Rage Against the Machine — was a one-off venture. That suspicion was given weight by their eponymous 2002 debut, which sounded as if Cornell wrote melodies and lyrics to tracks RATM wrote after the departure of Zack de la Rocha, but any lingering doubts about Audioslave being a genuine rock band are vanished by their 2005 second album, Out of Exile. Unlike the first record, Out of Exile sounds like the product of a genuine band, where all four members of the band contribute equally to achieve a distinctive, unified personality. It's still possible to hear elements of both Rage and Soundgarden here, but the two parts fuse relatively seamlessly, and there's a confidence to the band that stands in direct contrast to the halting, clumsy attack on the debut. A large part of the success of Out of Exile is due to the songs, which may be credited to the entire group but are clearly under the direction of Cornell, sounding much closer to his past work than anything in Rage's catalog. Even the simple riff-driven rockers are tightly constructed songs with melodies and dramatic tension — they lead somewhere instead of running in circles — while the ballads have a moody grace and there's the occasional left-field surprise like the sunny, sweet psych-pop gem "Dandelion"; it's the strongest set of songs Cornell has written in a decade. Which is not to say that Out of Exile is without excesses, but they're almost all from guitarist Tom Morello; his playing can still seem laborious, particularly when he clutters single-string riffs with too many notes (the otherwise fine opener, "Your Time Has Come," suffers from this), and his elastic stomp box excursions verge on self-parody on occasion. Still, these are isolated moments on an album that's otherwise lean, hard, strong, and memorable, a record that finds Audioslave coming into its own as a real rock band.
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  #3070  
Old 02-21-2010, 11:08 PM
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Review
by Stephen Cramer

Colin Meloy's dynamic vocals lead the way on Castaways and Cutouts, the impressive 2003 effort by Portland, OR, quintet the Decemberists. Throughout the disc, Meloy's songs tell tales of life's castaways, including Spanish gypsies and Turkish prostitutes, painting glorious pictures with supposedly suspicious characters. After opening the album with two subdued tracks, "July, July!" is a lively anthem, setting a gloriously quirky pace for the rest of the disc. "A Cautionary Song" centers around Jenny Conlee's accordion, as acoustic guitar swirls around Meloy's narrative. "Odalisque" is quite possibly the highlight of the album, carrying the listener through peaks and valleys led by Conlee's juiced-up organ and Meloy's grittiest vocals of the disc. "Cocoon" calms the mood back down, with gentle piano and guitar serving as the song's backbone. On "The Legionnaire's Lament," the band's effortless folk is at its best, with choppy guitars and enchanting organ swirling behind Meloy's relentlessly thrilling storytelling. Yet again, the disc continues a rise-and-fall approach as the restrained and engaging "Clementine" is next, followed by the beautiful "California One," which features some jaw-dropping upright bass by Nate Query. That song makes a seamless transition into the closer, "Youth and Beauty Brigade," a carefully crafted epic full of witticisms and reserved style. Meloy's vocals are their most engaging by now, and while the last track might not be the standout song of the disc, it's perfectly positioned on the disc for maximum effect. The song's rising intensity and lyrical imagery add up for a stunning finish, leaving the listener clamoring for more, as all great albums do. Chris Funk adds guitar and theremin, and drummer Ezra Holbrook rounds out the five-piece band. Originally released in 2002 on Hush Records, Kill Rock Stars Records released Castaways and Cutouts in May 2003.
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  #3071  
Old 02-21-2010, 11:56 PM
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Review by Heather Phares

On Her Majesty, the Decemberists' follow-up to their excellent debut, Castaways and Cutouts, the group cements its reputation as a seafaring Belle & Sebastian or a more grounded Neutral Milk Hotel. Tying together sweet symphonic pop with a ragtag theatricality, this album is more ambitious and more scattered than Castaways and Cutouts, making it an initially less accessible and more difficult listen. However, many of Her Majesty's most indulgent moments are among its best, including the high drama of the album opener, "Shanty for the Aretheusa," an epic that runs with the dark beauty that haunted the corners of the Decemberists' debut and gives it a wild, rambling edge. Likewise, "The Gymnast, High Above the Ground" also displays the band's expertise at creating subtle but palpable drama and swooning romanticism with just a few musical brush strokes. The wonderfully named "I Was Meant for the Stage," a triumphantly bittersweet song for the inner drama queen in everyone, shows off Colin Meloy's uniquely expressive voice: at one moment he's lispingly fey; the next, he's sneering self-deprecatingly. These beautiful, challenging songs make the band's occasional dips into treacle, such as the cloying "Billy Liar," forgivable, but what makes Her Majesty such a solid album is the consistent quality of the songs pitched between its high and low points. "Los Angeles, I'm Yours" flirts with soft rock, coming across as a latter-day single from Al Stewart; "Your Red Right Ankle" is an intimately and creatively detailed love song; and "Song for Myla Goldberg" has a sunny, winning appeal. Even though Her Majesty isn't quite as striking and full-formed as Castaways and Cutouts, it's still a consistently charming album that finds the band coming into its own.
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Old 02-22-2010, 04:56 AM
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Ruben Blades - Amor Y Control:





Rubén Blades' 1992 release Amor y Control may feature more variety, more stylistic diversity than any other before or after. Considering that Blades has made a career out of musical globetrotting, that's quite a statement. However, with virtually every track choosing a different Latin American or Caribbean nation as it's home, it's quite justified. From merengue to samba to West Indies funk to the salsa that made him famous, Blades never seems to find home, he's as full of wanderlust as the ships that grace the album's cover. Often times when a musician attempts such an epic project, instead of playing one style well, all come out mediocre. Not the case with Blades and his band Son de Solar, which is made up of players so sensitive, adaptable and expert, one would think that each idiomatic style was their specialty. Highlights are numerous, including "West Indian Man," a tribute to the backbone of the workforce who built the canal in Blades' native Panama, staying true to his commitment to social and political commentary. The title track's melodically unforgettable hook proves once again that Blades is among salsa's most innovative, tuneful songwriters. Though many of the tracks from Amor y Control can be found on collections, there's a depth and beauty to the work that can only be appreciated as a whole. This disc is worth owning. ~ Evan C. Gutierrez, All Music Guide All Music Guide
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Old 02-22-2010, 05:43 AM
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Gary Numan TeleKon

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Telekon
Studio album by Gary Numan Released September 5, 1980 Recorded 1980 at Rock City Studios, London Genre New Wave, electronic music, synthpop Length 49:54 Label Beggars Banquet Producer Gary Numan Professional reviews Gary Numan chronology The Pleasure Principle
(1979) Telekon
(1980) Dance
(1981) Telekon is the fourth studio album, and second album under his own name, by electronic music pioneer Gary Numan, released in 1980.
The album debuted at the top of the UK charts in September 1980, making it his third consecutive (and to date, final) no.1 album.
Telekon is also the third and final studio release of what Numan retrospectively termed the "Machine" section of his career, following Replicas and The Pleasure Principle in 1979.[1] It was his last album before his brief "retirement" from touring, and the last to feature bassist Paul Gardiner, a member of Numan's band since the early days of Tubeway Army.
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In contrast to The Pleasure Principle, with its lack of guitars and its harsh robotic sound, Telekon featured heavy use of guitars and strings along with richer synthesizer textures, Numan broadening his previous synth palette with additional machines such as the Sequential Circuits Prophet-5, ARP Pro Soloist and Roland Jupiter-4.
Lyrically, whilst continuing Numan's exploration of a dystopian future in pieces like the title track and "I Dream of Wires", the album also took stock of the artist's sudden celebrity and the apparently overwhelming adulation of his fans in songs like "Remind Me to Smile" ("Reconsider 'fame' / I need new reasons / This is detention / It's not fun at all ... Keep your revivals / Keep your conventions / Keep all your fantasies / That's all we are") and "Please Push No More". The album's musical style ranged from upbeat songs such as "I'm an Agent" and "The Joy Circuit" to mood pieces like "Sleep by Windows" and "Remember I Was Vapour".
Telekon was preceded by two hit singles, "We Are Glass" and "I Die: You Die", though neither of these was included on the album in its initial UK vinyl release (overseas releases such as the US and Australia added "I Die: You Die" in place of "Sleep by Windows"). Early UK pressings came with a limited edition live 45, "Remember I Was Vapour" b/w "On Broadway", and all of these tracks, along with B-sides and the outtake "A Game Called 'Echo'", were subsequently included on various CD reissues. Numan had premiered "Remember I Was Vapour" during the UK leg of 'The Touring Principle' in late 1979, preceding its appearance on Telekon by a year. He also premiered "We Are Glass", "I Die: You Die" and "Remind Me to Smile" during the April 1980 leg.
The only single taken from the album was the opening number "This Wreckage"; though it failed to chart higher than number 20 and the composer admitted that regardless of its merits as a song it was a "bloody stupid single".[2] Surprisingly – and to his later regret – Numan declined to issue the anthemic "Remind Me to Smile" as a single (although it was released as a promo single in the US).
Track 11, "The Joy Circuit", uses a combination of synths and string instruments, notably the violin, to create an orchestral ambience. Lyrics include the then-trademark reference to William Burroughs, notably "We're on joy circuit / The image fix / Rewind, cry / Well its somewhere to go".
From late 1980 to early 1981 Numan toured the UK, Europe and America in support of Telekon with guest Nash the Slash and a lavish stage set; Numan's stage costume - a black leather boiler-suit with interlocking red belts - would be an enduring image. An early performance of 'The Teletour' was captured on the album Living Ornaments '80 and in a rendition of "Down in the Park" for the movie Urgh! A Music War (both 1981). The 2005 CD re-issue of Living Ornaments '80 included the original 10-track album and a recently re-discovered soundboard recording of the entire concert. The Teletour concluded in April 1981 with three sold-out nights at Wembley Arena where Numan brought down the curtain on this phase of his career in extravagant style, as recorded in the accompanying video Micromusic (soundtrack released in 1998 as Living Ornaments '81). Although these were billed as Numan's farewell concerts, he would play a series of US club dates the following year and returned to large-scale touring in 1983.
Like all of Numan's commercially popular early records, Telekon received a largely hostile reception from contemporary music critics; nevertheless it proved to be an influential work. Trent Reznor claimed to have listened to it every day during the making of Pretty Hate Machine and Stephin Merritt from The Magnetic Fields also became a Numan fan through the album.[3] Merritt recorded "I Die: You Die" as his contribution to the Random tribute album in 1997, which also included covers of "I'm an Agent", "Remember I Was Vapour" and "We Are Glass". However the earliest cover of a song from this album was in the very year of its release when Robert Palmer collaborated with Numan on a version of "I Dream of Wires" for the Clues LP.
In an unfortunate coincidence, Telekon was also released shortly before Post Office Telecommunications changed its name to British Telecom.
In December 2006, Numan undertook a Telekon "Classic Album" tour, comprising four concerts in the UK in which he played all the songs from the Telekon album (as well as its associated singles and B-sides). On the 2CD EKO: The Telekon 06 Audio Programme (sold at the 2006 Telekon gigs and from Numan's website), Numan discusses (with interviewer Steve Malins) the making of Telekon, revealing that it is his favourite of his "early albums."
In 2006, Numan promised fans a DVD release of the 1981 Micromusic video. On his official website in October 2008, Numan announced that the long-lost master tapes of the Micromusic concert had been found, "in excellent condition and, to make things even better, more footage has been found from two other camera positions that were not used on the original version. This new footage will be edited in to a new updated version...We expect this to be, with all the extra footage and interviews, a double disc DVD."[1]
[edit] Track listing

All songs are written by Gary Numan except for "Trois Gymnopédies", which is a composition by Erik Satie.
  1. "This Wreckage" – 5:26
  2. "The Aircrash Bureau" – 5:41
  3. "Telekon" – 4:29
  4. "Remind Me to Smile" – 4:03
  5. "Sleep by Windows" – 4:58
  6. "We Are Glass"* – 4:47
  7. "I'm an Agent" – 4:19
  8. "I Dream of Wires" – 5:10
  9. "Remember I Was Vapour" – 5:11
  10. "Please Push No More" – 5:39
  11. "The Joy Circuit" – 5:12
  12. "I Die: You Die"* – 3:47
  13. "A Game Called 'Echo'"* – 5:06
  14. "Photograph"* – 2:43
  15. "Down in the Park" (Piano Version)* – 2:27
  16. "Trois Gymnopédies (1st Movement)"* – 4:15
  • CD bonus tracks marked with asterisk.
[edit] Musicians

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  #3074  
Old 02-23-2010, 01:16 PM
Dreamnine Dreamnine is offline
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Old 02-23-2010, 03:23 PM
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I think I just threw up a little in my mouth.
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  #3076  
Old 02-23-2010, 03:29 PM
Dreamnine Dreamnine is offline
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Well, as ambient background it beats the radio..
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Old 02-23-2010, 03:53 PM
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Since when did Alice Cooper have a power ballad?
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Old 02-23-2010, 03:56 PM
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Old 02-23-2010, 03:59 PM
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Oh, I see, I just never considered that a power ballad.
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Old 02-23-2010, 04:02 PM
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Power ballads were a kind of 80s, early 90s thing. Probably the ultimate power ballad is Bonnie Tyler Total Eclipse Of The Heart.
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